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warned about acts of terror. >>> major u.s. media report that boeing has developed possible fixes for the battery problems of its dreamliner aircraft. if the fixes work, 787 airliners could be back in the air as early as april. the new boeing 787 fleet was grounded in january after a series of problems occurred with their lithium ion batteries. the "new york times" and the "wall street journal" report that boeing officials plan to propose the fixes to the federal aviation administration as early as friday. the u.s. newspapers say that boeing plans to redesign the arrangement of eight lithium ion batteries -- that's lithium ion cells in each battery -- and add insulation in between them. boeing told the media that the changes could minimize the risk of a short circuit or fire in one of the cells spreading to others. the plane manufacturer also told the media that it plans to put the batteries in new protective cases so that the failure of single cells will not cause fires. the two u.s. newspapers said the faa would not approve the proposed changes immediately. they report that fede
>>> cyber battle. the u.s. attorney general vs to fight back against hammers stealing trade secrets. u.s. leaders have to do more to fight hackers. attorney general eric holder says they're stealing information that belongs to american businesses. he pointed the finger at foreign companies and governments. >> this work is a to priority for the obama administration, for the entire administration and the dedicated men and women of the united states department of justice. >> holder said he was concerned about economic espionage and cyber attacks from people in china. he listed several cases in which chinese nationals were convicted of stealing trade or secrets. president barack obama expressed his worries last week in his state of the union. he said what he called enemies are trying to sabotage the power grid, financial institutions and air traffic control systems. obama signed a new executive order to strengthen cyber defenses. officials said last year that the number of cyber attacks targeting critical infrastructure has ren draticl dramatically. they reported 198 cases in 2011. only
this month. they will go over something that's been a thorn in japan-u. relatis. threlocation of a u.s. military base. both governments want the plan to go ahead but the people in japan south aren't on board. >> reporter: they talk about relocating the station. >> translar: we must remove as possible, in accordance with an agreement with the u.s. government. >> translator: we want the base to be moved out of okinawa. >> reporter: okinawa is japan's southernmost prefecture. the island district comprises only 0.6% of japan's land but hosts 70% of the u.s. bases in the nation. for many, futenma symbolizes okinawans unfair burden in ensuring japan's security. this is the futenma air station. you see aircrafts, runway and if you turn this way, you can see how close the residential area of okinawa is to the space. in 1996, the u.s. agreed to return the futenma site to japan. masahide ota was okinawa's governor then. >> i was so happy, and -- but after one year or so, i was told that the, even though they would return the futenma marine corps air base, they need to leave an occasional site to
for the worst. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. the u.s. trade gap narrows as the world buys more made in america products and the u.s. buys less foreign oil. >> susie: and with gas prices rising, chevy hopes its new diesel chevy cruze will attract buyers looking for more miles per gallon. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: millions of people are bracing tonight for a powerful snow storm that could cripple the east coast. some forecasters say this could be the blizzard of the century with record amounts of snow and extremely strong winds. in parts of the northeast, transportation was shut down. the governors of massachusetts and connecticut declared a state of emergency and banned car travel, train service and cancelled flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making prarations today. erika ller repor. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars strande
officials are trying to find out who made the decision to lock on. now, the u.s. state department spokesperson expressed her concern over the incident. >> actions such as this escalate tensions and increase the risk of an incident or a miscalculation, and they could undermine peace, stability, and economic growth in this vital region. so we are concerned about it. >> u.s. officials have been increasingly uneasy about rising tensions in the area. >>> military analysts are trying to figure out what the chinese are trying to do. bonji ohara is a former navy captain with japan's self-defense forces. he says the chinese sent a clear message. >> it is a serious thing. if the radar is the fire-control radar, can control the weapon, usually a battlhipas that kind of radar, one is searching radar, for navigation. one is for the targeting, control weapon radar. this is the fc radar. this time chinese side used this fc radar. it means they showed to the ship they have the intention to attack the japanese ship. so it is very serious and danger. i think the -- there are two ssib scenarios one
council resolution. >> reporter: the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, echoed the strong criticism. >> the actions of north korea are a threat to regional peace and security, international peace and security, and they are not acceptable. they will not be tolerated. and they will be met with north korea's increasing isolation and pressure under united nations sanctions. >> reporter: the security council was quick to condemn the test. it also responded quickly in december when north korea successfully launched a long-range missile. the test could bring north korea closer to developing a nuclear warhead that is small enough to be mounted on a missile. critics point out that the security council members feel that the threat of north korea's program is becoming more rea than ever before. >> so miki, what's next? will the security council adopt tougher sanctions against north korea? >> reporter: well, the u.s., along with south korea, australia, and european members are all for tougher sanctions. these may include tightening the noose on north korea's financial institutions and weapons t
. >> reporter: despite solid earnings at the end of last year, there are fresh worries about the state of the u.s. economy and profits for this year. on top of that, financial conditions in the eurozone are still a threat to u.s. stocks. >> with the market at current levels, which... basically looks like they're priced for perfection, there doesn't leave a lot of room for any disappointing news. and there are a lot of areas that could create disappointing news. >> reporter: weissberg says many market pros believe stocks are headed higher, but they need a catalyst, and that's unlikely to come from tonight's state of the union. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, why ailing smartphone maker blackberry is hoping the sports market will help it on its road to recovery. we'll explain in tonight's "beyond the scoreboard." a "silly sideshow--" that's what apple c.e.o. tim cook called a recent lawsuit filed by hedge fund manager david einhorn. speaking at a goldman sachs technology conference today, cook also said apple is considering einhorn's proposal to issue preferred stock and r
agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. play awesome electric company games and earn points for your favorite person, like me, hector. i mean, i'm your favorite, right? so what are you waiting for? i'm great at telling people what to do. hey kids! pick up that trash. kidding with these, right? hey! (sneezing) bless you! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. susie is off tonight. the easy talk, but difficult plans to meet the challenge of creating more middle class jobs. finance ministers and central bankers from the world's biggest economies meet to debate spending cuts versus growth. we look at international investing and pockets of strength around the globe. and, hedge fund manager carl icahn ups his stake in herbalife, calling the vitamin maker a legit business. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." investors spent much of this week focused on the u.s. market with major market indexes hitting five-year highs. but now the spotlight is shifting overseas. g-20 finance minister
erican greetings, proud sponsor of "the electric company." agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. go online now to pbskidsgo.org and play some electric company games. you can win points forll of your favorite people, or your most favorite person, me, manny spamboni. now go, because the next time i see you, i better have more points. you're almost there! i need that cheese. you got it, you got it! come on, buddy, i need the cheese. and didn't we know how to a...da -- sorry. (laughter) ooh, i threw my neck out! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening. i'm susie gharib. hewlett-packard's turnaround gains traction, c.e.o. meg whitman in with a winning quarter and an improved outlook. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. from weakening demand, to currency concerns, we look at what's behind the big selloff in commodities. >> susie: and u.s. companies and infrastructure are increasing under the threat of cyber attack. we look at a new plan tying safeguards to trade policy. >> tom: that and more tonight
over one day. another factor is there are rebels jihaddists, al-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i read it several times. you are reporting from people within the whitehouse they're beginning to consider as a condition deteriorates reopening that debate. is that the extent of what you're saying. >> the way i would put it is they haven't rul
>>> long road ahead. authorities in the u.s. investigate the dreamliner and find its batteries could keep it on the ground for sometime to come. u.s. transportation investigators cast doubt on a quick fix for the problems facing the dreamliner. they say regulators need to rethink their approval of batteries used in the boeing 787. a number of agencies are looking in to a string of safety incidents. deborah hershman chairs. she said a lithium ion battery sparked a fire a month ago on a japan airlines yet in boston. >> this investigation has demonstrated that a short circuit in a single cell can propagate to adjacent cells and result in smoke and fire. >> engineers packaged eight cells together in designing the battery system for the dreamliner. hersman said they did not place them far enough apart so trouble in one of them could affect the others. she said investigators have not determined why the batteries short circuited. another battery fire forced the pilot of a dreamline tore make an emergency last month in western japan. u.s. authorities grounded all 787s. officials at boe
and taiwan claim it. former u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton says the obama administration opposing any unilateral action. her successor, john kerry, supports that position. >>> rebels in syria are making important strides. it provides electricity to aleppo and other northern cities. the rebels have surrounded a aleppo airport and other places around the country. they launched a major attack. they are vowing to liberate the capital damascus. they are worried civil war may be spilling across the border. it killed 12 people and damaged vehicles taking aid supplies to syria. >>> european authorities are investigating several firms in connection with a meat labeling scandal. food safety regulators are looking into the possibility someone deliberately switched beef for horse meat because it's cheaper to produce. officials in britain and ireland studied frozen lasagnes and hamburgers sold this year in supermarkets. the british regulators found 60% of the meat used in lasagne was from horses, but the products were labeled as 100% beef. they recalled them after tests confirmed they containe
>>> they want to snow why another crew locked onto a helicopter. japanese and u.s. officials are urging the chinese to ensure such accidents don't happen again. a chinese navy aimed at a helicopter in mid-january. japa controls the islands. china and taiwan claim them. >> translator: it's extremely regrettable that such a unilateral provocative action has been taken. we will strongly urge the chinese to exercise restraint and not make the situation any worse. >> a spokesperson said she learned about the incident through the media. japanese government officials say the chinese are trying to give the impression they're not behind the incidents. >>> the u.s. defense secretary says it could have had grave consequences. l leon panetta says it could inflame intentions. >> they have to be part of family of nations in that region working gether. >> panetta said the united states, south korea and japan will do everything possible to ensure their territories are secu secure. he called on china to avoid antagonizing other nations. the former secretary of state said u.s. officials oppose
american greetings, proud sponsor of "the electric company." agreement from the u.s. department of education's ready to learn grant, and viewers like you, thank you. just go online to pbskidsgo.org. we have behind-the-scenes, entire episodes, and loads of brand-new games all the time. but n't just take my wd for it, go, check it out for yourself. play your harmonica like you mean it! this is going to go on a long time! and i'm not sorry to do it! i love that thing! i like your hat! i like your shoes! (laughter) captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. susie is off tonight. from less money in your paycheck, to paying more at the gas pump, consumers are feeling the pinch, now company's dependent on spending, are feeling the heat. then there's coming government spending cuts. does the economy have enough kick in it to withstand the sequester? and a big win for activist investor david einhorn in his fight to get apple to share the wealth, with its shareholders. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! if you get a paycheck, no doubt you have see
says iran will be at the top of his agenda when u.s. president barack obama visits israel next month. >>> chinese officials have tak over management of a port in pakistan. officials from a chinese state run firm acquired the rights last month to control gwadar port in south western pakistan. it lies near the strait of hormuz. pakistani president and chinese ambassador attended a hand over ceremony in the capital. the port is strategic for chichn it imports crude oil from the north. >> it gives importance to china-pakistan relations. >> the chinese ambassador says much of china remains unstable. they must take advantage when they see openings. >> to seize opportunities. >> chise companies were recent involved in a series of port projects in myanmar. the entrance into pakistan has raised concerns in india. >>> people in many parts of china say the clouds of smog they have seen for weeks make it harder to breathe. scientists say particles in the air could damage people's health. researchers studied samples from the atmosphere over beijing and two other areas. they detected a harmful com
sharply lower after a strong rally on monday. the drop follows a slump in u.s. markets. the yen strength has been a drag on a wide range of issues. they are concerned about whether italy can consider its final reforms. the nikkei average is down 1.75%. the dollar was at a one month low and not a one month high. let's take a look at other markets in the asia pacific. south korea's kospi down a thirthird of a percent. let's see what's going in australia. it's down to 5,018. we'll see where other markets take us as they open in next hour. japan's prime minister abe has made his choice for the new bank of japan leader. looks like many leaders of the oppotion party of japan wi goalong with it. kuroda is the chief of the asian development bank. abe is planning to present his nominees to the diet for approval by the end of this week. the government needs support from opposition parties. some members have expressed concerns. they say signing off on his appointment could be construed as approving the there isn't much doubt about his ability. some say there's not much mileage in continuing its opp
assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape itself. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to
concerns at the u.s.-japan summit; a public health crisis linked to gun violence; shields and brooks and violence against women in south africa. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a winter storm headed east today, after socking the plains with snow, sleet and freezing rain. it was already blamed for four deaths, flight disruptions and hundreds of road accidents. the huge system was moving north and east, and losing some of its punch. but it was still expected to make trouble in the northeast and new england this weekend. the sounds of snowblowers roaring to life and shovels scraping the driveway could be heard in state after state today. much of the nation's mid-section spent the day digging out from more than a foot of snow and for drivers, it quickly turned into an icy nightmare. the highly unsettled storm also brought lightning and thunder, but it was the snow falling at two inches an hour in places that caused the worst problems. kansas city mayor sly james said it was the pace that was hard to deal with. >> it fell fast, it fell heavy
and the technology industry. >> susie: the u.s. government wants as much as $5 billion from standard and poors, officially accusing the credit ratings agency of fraud during the housing boom. >> tom: and earnings from a trio of consumer stocks finds us spending money on eating out and watching tv. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> tom: a bold new chapter for computer maker dell was opened today. michael dell said today he's taking the company he founded almost 30 years ago private. it's a $24.5 billion deal offering dell investors $13.65 per share. now, at one point, dell was the largest p.c. maker in the world, boasting market capitalization of more than $100 billion. now, it sits behind apple, hewlett packard and lenovo, valued a fifth of what it once was. ruben ramirez begins are coverage. >> reporter: michael dell admits he missed the consumer shift away from the p.c. to tablets and smartphones, but today's announcement his company is going private doesn't necessary address how dell is going to try to capture those markets. >> they want to continue to be a hardware player, but
a secretive chinese military unit has hacked the computer systems of more than one hundred u.s. corporations and organizations. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we assess the damage done by the cyber attacks, and explore the motivations behind what appear to be china's systematic targeting of foreign firms and governments. >> woodruff: then, we turn to today's arguments at the supreme court over a patent case with implications for biotechnology giant monsanto, and a range of fields from medical research to computer software. >> ifill: we continue our weeklong focus on guns, "after newtown." tonight jeffrey brown reports on the possible links, if any, between violent video games and violent behavior. >> the result clearly shows that playing a violent video game increases aggressive behavior. >> one of the problems in this field is that people confuse aggression and violence. >> woodruff: and margaret warner gets an update on the oscar pistorius murder trial in south africa, as the prosecution and the defense lay out conflicting accounts o
broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: former u.s. senator chuck hagel faced a hostile reception today from half of the committee that must sign off before he can become secretary of defense. his senate confirmation hearing centered heavily on criticism from his one-time republican colleagues. the atmosphere was friendly enough at the outset as chuck hagel began his big day before the armed services committee. he quickly sought to allay concerns on both sides about h positions on everything from iran to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must maintain the strongest military in the world. >> i believe, and always have, that america must engage, not retreat, in the world, but engage in the world. my record is consistent on these points. >> woodruff: but as a nebraska senator, in 2007, hagel angered fellow republicans when he opposed the surge of u.s. troops into iraq
to stand on their own by 2014 when u.s. troops are scheduled to withdraw. and great power politics are on the a lend-- agenda again. china is confident, insertive in the south china sea in relations about moskow have cooled. all of this with a troubled economy at home and calls for a lighter footprint abroad. i'm pleased to have tom donilon back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: we are now into a second term. what do we mean by lighter footprint? >> well, if we step back on that, at the beginning of 2012, the president after a multimonth review, close consultation with the uniformed military, the joint chief, service secretaries and combatant commanders around the world put together a new defense strategy. that defense strategy had to take into account that the budget control act required the defense budget over ot next ten years to be reduced by $500 million or so, a little less than that. and which would require a 5% decrease over what were the plans. and in doing that the president asked the military to think about what the new challenges were going to be.
led her to create the post of u.s. ambassador for global women's issues. she appointed melanne verveer, a long-time aide and friend. >> well, you know, as first lady she had impact on our own policies. it was she who very much became a proponent for micro credit for women who were in the poorest circumstances being lifted up with training and small amounts of credit. girls' education. so she ha pli impacts certainly in development during those years. as senator she continued to be active on those issues. the work that went on with afghan women early in 2003 recognizing how critical they would be to the creation of a better future for afghan women. she was very involved in when she traveled as a senator. she didn't travel that much internationally, but when she did, to afghanistan or to iraq, she met wit all of theey peop, but she always asked that she also meet with some of the key women. and then as secretary, she really made these issues a cornerstone of our foreign policy, obviously, in creating the position that i have, which is the first ever u.s. ambassador for global women's iss
and a nobel prize. >> the role of the u.s. changing, something we need to address as americans. and i set out to try to discover how these multiple revolutionary changes are interrelating one with another. and atchoishey pose to us, how we really have to get involved in steering our way into the future. and choosing options that can make it better than it otherwise might be. >> a conversation with al gore, next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i s
life in prison. in economic news, output at u.s. auto plants fell in january, and that pushed overall manufacturing down after two months of gains. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average gained eight points to close at 13,981. the nasdaq fell six points to close at 3,192. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq dropped a tenth of a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: president obama wrapped up his post-state of the union tour with a visit to his hometown today. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the president's trip to chicago came amid the country's new focus on gun violence. and while he was there to talk about raising the minimum wage and expanding preschool for children, the city's surge of gun killings wasn't far from his mind. >> last year, there were 443 murders with a firearm on the streets of this city, and 65 of those victims were 18 and under. so that's the equivalent of a newtown everfour months. and that's precisely why the overwhelming majority of americans are asking for some common-sense propo
in --. >> in the middle of the night there was a theft. in europe and possibly japan in the u.s. these animals can go for many tens of thousands of dollars. >> rose: now the plow share tortoise was once thought to be extinct? >> it was once thoug to be extinc as are the case with many species of turtles and tortoises. >> rose: then they find something that says "no, they're not all gone." >> they were rediscovered in 1971 but prior to '97 71 only a handful had reached the western world. the species e.e.g. i don't gofy had been contracted to a tiny range and a remote part of madagascar so it was unclear if there were any left. so >> so if you had unlimited resources-- and you may as far as i kw-- >> i don't, trust me. >> rose: if you had more money could you do more? >> absolutely, sure. when you choose to protect a species it's almost like going into a war. you have to choose your battles and you have to figure out -- it's a horrible thing to say but you have to figure out where can you make a measurable difference? in the case of the plow share tortoise i thought i could make a difference. i thought
in cyberspace. >> it is costing hundreds of billions of dollars and thousands of u.s. jobs every year. >> counterterrorism expert who worked under the reagan administration, both the bushes, president clinton. the pit cyber warfare they're waiting on the united states and have been doing it for years. who has been minding the store? >> there was a bill that had been agreed to on some cybersecurity and, you may recall, that the privacy aficionado's went bonkers it is it bananas' and bonkers together. they flooded their members of congress and and it did not pass anything. meanwhile, there is not a serious person in washington of any ideology who has not known with increasing power that this is a problem. the president said he will use his executive powers to do it and for all these people on the internet, this is just like a range and there can be no regulation whatsoever. it will come back to haunt us. >> we have this huge defense establishment and we have a place in maryland where they're supposed to know about this. >> it raises a strategic question we have now really thought throug
.3% in february and 0.3% in march. they estimateroduction will grow. the head of the u.s. federal reserve ben bernanke has defended the central bank's policy of monetary easing. he's aiming to eliminate speculation the bank will scale back asset buying sooner than expected. bernanke testified before house of representatives lawmakers on wednesday. >> significant majority of the committee is supportive of the policies we have taken. the it strateg yet.ew review of i think we will have to do that sometime soon. we're quite comfortable we can exit in way that's both smooth and in which we provide lots of information to markets in advance so they will know what's coming and be able to anticipate it. >> bernanke referred to monetary policy in japan saying policy had been too cautious in the past. bernanke noted that the new prime ministernd his nominee for bank of japan governor will likely push for bold monetary measures to end deflation. let's get a check on the markets. tokyo share prices are trading higher today with export related stocks leading the gains. investors are feeling positive. bett
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)